Mott’s Response to the Flint Water Crisis

The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation has committed up to $100 million over five years to help our home community recover and rise from its water crisis. This page will provide ongoing updates regarding our progress toward that goal.

Total Flint Water-Related Grantmaking to Date

$44.3 Million

See All Related Grants

$4.3M

Safe Drinking Water

Access to Safe Drinking Water

From furnishing residents with home water filters and helping the community reconnect to the Detroit water system, to supporting the independent oversight of local water testing activities, Mott is working to help ensure that all Flint residents have access to clean, safe drinking water.

  • City of Flint: $4 million to help the city reconnect to the Detroit water system.

    United Way of Genesee County: $100,000 to provide lead-eliminating water filters to city of Flint residents.

    City of Flint: $120,000 to support the development of an action plan to replace all residential and galvanized service lines throughout the city.

    Community Foundation of Greater Flint: $100,000 to support Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Marc Edwards to act as advisors on the sampling of water, ongoing issues related to water quality, and water infrastructure upgrades.

See Safe Drinking Water Grants

$6.4M

Healthy Families

Meeting the Health Needs of Families

Mott grantmaking is helping to mitigate the health impacts of lead exposure among Flint residents, especially children. This includes support for expanded access to nutritious foods and medical and mental health services, and for efforts designed to help the community meet emerging and future health needs resulting from the water crisis.

  • Foundation for Flint: $5 million to support programs that address the impact of lead exposure in Flint children and families.

    Food Bank of Eastern Michigan: $284,000 for the operation of two community Help Centers in Flint. The centers offer residents a “one-stop shop” for bottled water and filters, food assistance and other essential services. Also, $160,000 to fund facility enhancements that will enable the Food Bank to process millions of pounds of donated frozen produce that is high in nutrients recommended by the medical community to mitigate the effects of lead exposure, especially in children.

    Fair Food Network: $100,000 to expand the successful Double Up Food Bucks program, which doubles the value of SNAP Bridge Cards at the Flint Farmers’ Market and select stores in Flint. This program is helping to provide the healthy fruits and vegetables necessary for families affected by lead.

    Genesee Health System: $473,000 to increase community-based mental health services in Flint.

    Greater Flint Health Coalition: $245,000 to help the organization increase its capacity to lead the design, coordination and delivery of health-related activities in response to the Flint water crisis.

    Pew Charitable Trusts: $50,000 to include input from Flint residents in a national research effort that seeks to offer local, state and national recommendations for addressing the impacts of lead in policies related to water infrastructure, housing, early childhood education and health.

    United Way of Genesee County: $90,000 to support community communications efforts of the Flint Water Recovery Group, a network of 160 nonprofit agencies, faith-based organizations, grassroots groups and individuals. The project will provide credible and accessible information to the community about water quality and available services through the Flintcares.com website and The Bottom Line print publication.

    Valley Area Agency on Aging: $43,000 to support community events that provide seniors with water-related information, access to lead-mitigating foods and opportunities to address their transportation needs.

See Healthy Families Grants

$23.4M

Educational Opportunity

Supporting Educational Opportunity

To ensure that all Flint kids, especially those who have been exposed to lead, have the tools they need to succeed in school, work and life, Mott is helping to expand early childhood education services in the city, and support a reimagined approach to community education. We’re also funding local afterschool, summer and youth employment programs, and efforts to help area young people stay engaged in their education.

  • Crim Fitness Foundation: $2.9 million to expand community schools programming to all Flint Community Schools. The community schools strategy will help make available the strong, research-based educational and enrichment opportunities needed to mitigate the long-term impacts of lead exposure.

    Flint Community Schools: More than $1 million to help the Flint Community Schools respond to the needs of children and families affected by the water crisis. Those grants are:

    • $234,000 to build the district’s capacity to provide the high-quality educational programming and enrichment activities needed to bolster children against the negative effects of lead exposure.
    • $100,000 to support the superintendent with technical assistance to ensure high-quality educational programming and enrichment activities within the Flint Community Schools system.
    • $417,415 to help implement a model of instruction designed to help refine and supplement teacher instructional skills to meet rigorous academic standards and develop principals’ skills to support teacher instruction.
    • $87,000 to provide young at-risk children and their families with the academic, social, nutrition and fitness supports necessary for future educational success and to mitigate the negative health impacts of lead absorption, particularly among young children.
    • $250,000 to support the district in developing and executing a marketing campaign aimed at retaining and recruiting students to the district, which has become even more important given the potential destabilizing effects of the water crisis on the city’s residential population.

    Foundation for Flint: $9 million to support the construction of a new early childhood education center in Flint. Expanding the number of high quality early childhood education slots has become an urgent priority as a result of the city’s water crisis.

    Foundation for the Uptown Reinvestment Corporation: $1 million to renovate a former elementary school into an early education center that will provide services for young children in Flint who may have been exposed to lead.

    Community Foundation of Greater Flint: $300,000 to support the management of an early childhood education partnership in Flint. Early learning opportunities are essential to helping educators and families identify and address the needs of young children exposed to lead.

    Genesee Area Focus Fund: $3.1 million to provide high-quality, research-based afterschool programming in all Flint public schools. As a crucial part of community school programming, YouthQuest includes academic support, enrichment activities, physical fitness and healthy behaviors, nutrition education, youth development and leadership skill-building, and family and community engagement, all of which are important for children who may have been exposed to lead.

    Michigan State University: $2.12 million to support Flint Community Schools with technical assistance aimed at improving teaching and learning across the district, a goal which has become even more important with the exposure to lead among Flint children.

    Cranbrook Educational Community: $263,660 to provide Flint students in grades K–12 with supplemental educational opportunities in STEM, which has become even more important in light of the city’s water crisis.

    Boys & Girls Club of Greater Flint: $55,000 to provide year-round educational, recreational, health and family support services to young people in Flint between the ages of 7 and 17. Educational and enrichment opportunities for children and youth are important interventions to help mitigate the long-term impacts of exposure to lead.

    Flint Cultural Center Corporation: $100,000 to support outreach and educational programming for students attending Flint Community Schools and other at-risk youth living in the community. Also, $250,000 to determine the feasibility of a school located on the Flint Cultural Center campus that offers an enriched arts- and science-based curriculum. High quality educational and enrichment programming are crucial interventions in addressing the long-term impacts of childhood exposure to lead.

    Genesee Area Focus Fund: $825,000 in 2016 and $825,000 in 2017 to provide paid job opportunities and leadership training for teens in Flint during the summer months. The program will emphasize placing teens at businesses and nonprofits that are providing services to residents who have been affected by the water crisis.

    Genesee Intermediate School District: $150,000 to support the Genesee Early College, an innovative, educational program designed to prepare high school students for academic and professional careers in health and the science, technology, engineering and math fields. Faculty will encourage students to enroll in coursework that focuses on the Flint water crisis and that provides youth with a platform to share their related perspectives on campus and in the community.

    Greater Flint Health Coalition: $175,000 to build the long-term capacity of Flint’s healthcare sector to respond to the water crisis by creating sustainable employment opportunities and promoting career advancement for healthcare workers who are residents of Flint and Genesee County.

    Metro Community Development: $52,708 to promote economic and social recovery from the Flint water crisis by expanding educational, career and life opportunities for Flint area youth.

    Mott Community College: $49,050 to reconnect participants to education that will lead toward obtaining a high school diploma, GED, and higher education or employment. Eligible students will have the opportunity to apply for jobs distributing water through the Flint WaterWorks program.

    Specialized Employment Services, Inc.: $85,000 to encourage at-risk youth to complete high school and empower them to make informed career decisions through attitudinal training, skill enhancement, mentoring, tutoring, summer employment placement, and follow-up services during the school year. Over the course of the summer, students will take part in weekly water-related volunteer activities. Also, $150,000 to provide employment training, job placement and support services for Flint area residents seeking entry-level jobs, and prepare workers to assume jobs related to water recovery.

    Sphinx Organization: $100,000 to introduce students in all Flint public elementary schools to classical music and the violin. The program will provide students with free group violin lessons after school as an important enrichment opportunity for students who may have been exposed to lead.

    University of Michigan-Flint: $415,700 in 2016 and $415,700 in 2017 to create and maintain a pipeline-to-college preparatory program that will equip young people from low-income families and underserved communities with the knowledge and skills they need to enter into and succeed in college. This program addresses the intensive educational needs of young people who may have been exposed to lead.

See Educational Opportunity Grants

$1.1M

Nonprofit Sector

Building a Robust Nonprofit Sector

Local community organizations remain a vital link in the response to Flint’s water crisis. Mott is helping these agencies to strengthen their operations, forge local partnerships and develop long-term responses to evolving local needs. We’ve also made grants to increase the number of state and national service members who are assisting locally in such areas as education, public safety, health and the environment.

  • City of Flint: $417,199 to provide staffing and consulting support to the City of Flint as it recovers from the water crisis.

    United Way of Genesee County: $250,000 to provide general purposes support to the United Way of Genesee County, a health and human services organization serving the residents of Genesee County. The agency has played a leading role in the local response to Flint’s water crisis.

    Community Foundation of Greater Flint: $250,000 to build the capacity of the Community Foundation of Greater Flint to continue its work related to the Flint water crisis response.

    Metro Community Development: $135,000 to build the capacity of the organization’s Community Development Financial Institution and asset building activities to promote small business and mortgage lending, and stabilize neighborhoods affected by the water crisis.

See Nonprofit Sector Grants

$0.4M

Community Engagement

Promoting Community Engagement

We believe Flint residents must have a voice in responding to the challenges posed by the city’s water crisis. To that end, Mott is supporting work with neighborhood associations, block clubs and other grassroots groups to engage people with the closest ties to the community in determining its future.

  • Greater Flint Health Coalition: $300,000 to provide consulting staff support for the Flint Future Action Coordination Team, which will convene cross-sectoral stakeholders to develop an organized, long-term response to the issues created by lead-contaminated water.

    Genesee County Habitat for Humanity: $140,000 to make grants available to organized neighborhood groups to fund projects with immediate positive impact on the neighborhood environment and residents’ quality of life.

See Community Engagement Grants

$8.7M

Economic Revitalization

Revitalizing the Local Economy

To restart and accelerate the economic recovery that was emerging in Flint when the water crisis hit, we’re supporting local initiatives that provide job training and placement, help budding entrepreneurs to launch new ventures, and engage residents in stabilizing and strengthening their neighborhoods. We continue to support the revitalization of Flint’s downtown corridor, as well as efforts to attract new employers and investment to the overall community.

  • Community Foundation of Greater Flint: $520,000 to support the Flint National Service Accelerator Fund, which helps Flint area agencies leverage state and national service members through the Corporation for National and Community Service and its affiliates. Flint area service members support a wide range of projects and activities, including assistance to area residents affected by the water crisis.

    Genesee Area Focus Fund: $2 million and $50,000 in 2016, and $2 million in 2017 to support efforts by the Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce to promote economic resilience in Flint and assist small businesses struggling to recover from the lead-in-water emergency.

    Center for Community Progress: $1.1 million in 2016 and $1 million in 2017 to support research, advocacy, technical assistance and capacity building to combat the negative effects of property vacancy and abandonment in post-industrial urban areas, with a special focus on helping Flint neighborhoods to recover from the adverse effects of the water crisis.

    Genesee County Land Bank Authority: $240,000 to engage residents affected by the water crisis in the planning and decision-making processes that shape their neighborhoods.

    Local Initiatives Support Corporation: $100,000 to continue the work of transforming distressed neighborhoods into livable communities, with particular focus on assisting Flint’s community development organizations to respond to the adverse effects of the water crisis on neighborhoods.

    Court Street Village Non-Profit Housing Corporation: $40,000 to support comprehensive neighborhood stabilization and revitalization strategies to combat the destabilizing effects of the water crisis in the Central Park and Fairfield Village neighborhoods of Flint.

    Foundation for the Uptown Reinvestment Corporation: $150,000 in 2016 and $150,000 in 2017 to enable the Flint Farmers’ Market to serve as a community health and wellness hub that combats the negative effects of lead exposure through year-round access to fresh produce and to services at the Hurley Children’s Center, which is located on the market’s premises. Also, $100,000 to support Flint area residents in developing food products for distribution and retail consumption through a commercial kitchen food business incubator located within the market. The Flint Food Works kitchen offers a unique community benefit by providing nutritional education to residents on how to prepare healthy food that will mitigate the effects of lead.

    Genesee Chamber Foundation: $159,000 to create an editorially independent online publication that highlights the people and projects helping to fuel Flint’s ongoing revitalization. Also, $150,000 to support a program that, by expanding community access to grocery stores, seeks to help residents obtain the healthy foods that can reduce the long-term impacts of lead exposure.

    Crim Fitness Foundation: $100,000 to support the Crim Fitness Foundation, which focuses on active living, physical fitness, nutrition and mindfulness. The Crim offers year-round programming for children and adults throughout the greater Flint area, much of which can help to address the health and wellness of Flint families and children who have been exposed to lead.

    Genesee County Parks & Recreation Commission: $25,000 to support parks programs and facilities in providing high quality recreational and learning opportunities for children and families, both of which are important in addressing the potential effects of childhood lead exposure.

    United Way of Genesee County: $143,000 to support and expand Flint SOUP, a program that helps area residents express their creative ideas, connect to the city’s broader entrepreneurial network, and explore and advance their small business concepts. Also, $100,000 to support efforts by the Flint Area Reinvestment Office to facilitate innovative community and economic development initiatives in the greater Flint area.

    Mott Community College: $400,000 to help residents obtain job training and career advancement opportunities that will add economic strength to their families and the community.

    St. Luke N.E.W. Life Center: $140,000 to provide underserved workers with job training and wraparound services that will help them to find and retain long-term, living-wage employment.

See Economic Revitalization Grants

Access to Safe Drinking Water

From furnishing residents with home water filters and helping the community reconnect to the Detroit water system, to supporting the independent oversight of local water testing activities, Mott is working to help ensure that all Flint residents have access to clean, safe drinking water.

  • City of Flint: $4 million to help the city reconnect to the Detroit water system.

    United Way of Genesee County: $100,000 to provide lead-eliminating water filters to city of Flint residents.

    City of Flint: $120,000 to support the development of an action plan to replace all residential and galvanized service lines throughout the city.

    Community Foundation of Greater Flint: $100,000 to support Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Marc Edwards to act as advisors on the sampling of water, ongoing issues related to water quality, and water infrastructure upgrades.

See Safe Drinking Water Grants

Meeting the Health Needs of Families

Mott grantmaking is helping to mitigate the health impacts of lead exposure among Flint residents, especially children. This includes support for expanded access to nutritious foods and medical and mental health services, and for efforts designed to help the community meet emerging and future health needs resulting from the water crisis.

  • Foundation for Flint: $5 million to support programs that address the impact of lead exposure in Flint children and families.

    Food Bank of Eastern Michigan: $284,000 for the operation of two community Help Centers in Flint. The centers offer residents a “one-stop shop” for bottled water and filters, food assistance and other essential services. Also, $160,000 to fund facility enhancements that will enable the Food Bank to process millions of pounds of donated frozen produce that is high in nutrients recommended by the medical community to mitigate the effects of lead exposure, especially in children.

    Fair Food Network: $100,000 to expand the successful Double Up Food Bucks program, which doubles the value of SNAP Bridge Cards at the Flint Farmers’ Market and select stores in Flint. This program is helping to provide the healthy fruits and vegetables necessary for families affected by lead.

    Genesee Health System: $473,000 to increase community-based mental health services in Flint.

    Greater Flint Health Coalition: $245,000 to help the organization increase its capacity to lead the design, coordination and delivery of health-related activities in response to the Flint water crisis.

    Pew Charitable Trusts: $50,000 to include input from Flint residents in a national research effort that seeks to offer local, state and national recommendations for addressing the impacts of lead in policies related to water infrastructure, housing, early childhood education and health.

    United Way of Genesee County: $90,000 to support community communications efforts of the Flint Water Recovery Group, a network of 160 nonprofit agencies, faith-based organizations, grassroots groups and individuals. The project will provide credible and accessible information to the community about water quality and available services through the Flintcares.com website and The Bottom Line print publication.

    Valley Area Agency on Aging: $43,000 to support community events that provide seniors with water-related information, access to lead-mitigating foods and opportunities to address their transportation needs.

See Healthy Families Grants

Supporting Educational Opportunity

To ensure that all Flint kids, especially those who have been exposed to lead, have the tools they need to succeed in school, work and life, Mott is helping to expand early childhood education services in the city, and support a reimagined approach to community education. We’re also funding local afterschool, summer and youth employment programs, and efforts to help area young people stay engaged in their education.

  • Crim Fitness Foundation: $2.9 million to expand community schools programming to all Flint Community Schools. The community schools strategy will help make available the strong, research-based educational and enrichment opportunities needed to mitigate the long-term impacts of lead exposure.

    Flint Community Schools: More than $1 million to help the Flint Community Schools respond to the needs of children and families affected by the water crisis. Those grants are:

    • $234,000 to build the district’s capacity to provide the high-quality educational programming and enrichment activities needed to bolster children against the negative effects of lead exposure.
    • $100,000 to support the superintendent with technical assistance to ensure high-quality educational programming and enrichment activities within the Flint Community Schools system.
    • $417,415 to help implement a model of instruction designed to help refine and supplement teacher instructional skills to meet rigorous academic standards and develop principals’ skills to support teacher instruction.
    • $87,000 to provide young at-risk children and their families with the academic, social, nutrition and fitness supports necessary for future educational success and to mitigate the negative health impacts of lead absorption, particularly among young children.
    • $250,000 to support the district in developing and executing a marketing campaign aimed at retaining and recruiting students to the district, which has become even more important given the potential destabilizing effects of the water crisis on the city’s residential population.

    Foundation for Flint: $9 million to support the construction of a new early childhood education center in Flint. Expanding the number of high quality early childhood education slots has become an urgent priority as a result of the city’s water crisis.

    Foundation for the Uptown Reinvestment Corporation: $1 million to renovate a former elementary school into an early education center that will provide services for young children in Flint who may have been exposed to lead.

    Community Foundation of Greater Flint: $300,000 to support the management of an early childhood education partnership in Flint. Early learning opportunities are essential to helping educators and families identify and address the needs of young children exposed to lead.

    Genesee Area Focus Fund: $3.1 million to provide high-quality, research-based afterschool programming in all Flint public schools. As a crucial part of community school programming, YouthQuest includes academic support, enrichment activities, physical fitness and healthy behaviors, nutrition education, youth development and leadership skill-building, and family and community engagement, all of which are important for children who may have been exposed to lead.

    Michigan State University: $2.12 million to support Flint Community Schools with technical assistance aimed at improving teaching and learning across the district, a goal which has become even more important with the exposure to lead among Flint children.

    Cranbrook Educational Community: $263,660 to provide Flint students in grades K–12 with supplemental educational opportunities in STEM, which has become even more important in light of the city’s water crisis.

    Boys & Girls Club of Greater Flint: $55,000 to provide year-round educational, recreational, health and family support services to young people in Flint between the ages of 7 and 17. Educational and enrichment opportunities for children and youth are important interventions to help mitigate the long-term impacts of exposure to lead.

    Flint Cultural Center Corporation: $100,000 to support outreach and educational programming for students attending Flint Community Schools and other at-risk youth living in the community. Also, $250,000 to determine the feasibility of a school located on the Flint Cultural Center campus that offers an enriched arts- and science-based curriculum. High quality educational and enrichment programming are crucial interventions in addressing the long-term impacts of childhood exposure to lead.

    Genesee Area Focus Fund: $825,000 in 2016 and $825,000 in 2017 to provide paid job opportunities and leadership training for teens in Flint during the summer months. The program will emphasize placing teens at businesses and nonprofits that are providing services to residents who have been affected by the water crisis.

    Genesee Intermediate School District: $150,000 to support the Genesee Early College, an innovative, educational program designed to prepare high school students for academic and professional careers in health and the science, technology, engineering and math fields. Faculty will encourage students to enroll in coursework that focuses on the Flint water crisis and that provides youth with a platform to share their related perspectives on campus and in the community.

    Greater Flint Health Coalition: $175,000 to build the long-term capacity of Flint’s healthcare sector to respond to the water crisis by creating sustainable employment opportunities and promoting career advancement for healthcare workers who are residents of Flint and Genesee County.

    Metro Community Development: $52,708 to promote economic and social recovery from the Flint water crisis by expanding educational, career and life opportunities for Flint area youth.

    Mott Community College: $49,050 to reconnect participants to education that will lead toward obtaining a high school diploma, GED, and higher education or employment. Eligible students will have the opportunity to apply for jobs distributing water through the Flint WaterWorks program.

    Specialized Employment Services, Inc.: $85,000 to encourage at-risk youth to complete high school and empower them to make informed career decisions through attitudinal training, skill enhancement, mentoring, tutoring, summer employment placement, and follow-up services during the school year. Over the course of the summer, students will take part in weekly water-related volunteer activities. Also, $150,000 to provide employment training, job placement and support services for Flint area residents seeking entry-level jobs, and prepare workers to assume jobs related to water recovery.

    Sphinx Organization: $100,000 to introduce students in all Flint public elementary schools to classical music and the violin. The program will provide students with free group violin lessons after school as an important enrichment opportunity for students who may have been exposed to lead.

    University of Michigan-Flint: $415,700 in 2016 and $415,700 in 2017 to create and maintain a pipeline-to-college preparatory program that will equip young people from low-income families and underserved communities with the knowledge and skills they need to enter into and succeed in college. This program addresses the intensive educational needs of young people who may have been exposed to lead.

See Educational Opportunity Grants

Building a Robust Nonprofit Sector

Local community organizations remain a vital link in the response to Flint’s water crisis. Mott is helping these agencies to strengthen their operations, forge local partnerships and develop long-term responses to evolving local needs. We’ve also made grants to increase the number of state and national service members who are assisting locally in such areas as education, public safety, health and the environment.

  • City of Flint: $417,199 to provide staffing and consulting support to the City of Flint as it recovers from the water crisis.

    United Way of Genesee County: $250,000 to provide general purposes support to the United Way of Genesee County, a health and human services organization serving the residents of Genesee County. The agency has played a leading role in the local response to Flint’s water crisis.

    Community Foundation of Greater Flint: $250,000 to build the capacity of the Community Foundation of Greater Flint to continue its work related to the Flint water crisis response.

    Metro Community Development: $135,000 to build the capacity of the organization’s Community Development Financial Institution and asset building activities to promote small business and mortgage lending, and stabilize neighborhoods affected by the water crisis.

See Nonprofit Sector Grants

Promoting Community Engagement

We believe Flint residents must have a voice in responding to the challenges posed by the city’s water crisis. To that end, Mott is supporting work with neighborhood associations, block clubs and other grassroots groups to engage people with the closest ties to the community in determining its future.

  • Greater Flint Health Coalition: $300,000 to provide consulting staff support for the Flint Future Action Coordination Team, which will convene cross-sectoral stakeholders to develop an organized, long-term response to the issues created by lead-contaminated water.

    Genesee County Habitat for Humanity: $140,000 to make grants available to organized neighborhood groups to fund projects with immediate positive impact on the neighborhood environment and residents’ quality of life.

See Community Engagement Grants

Revitalizing the Local Economy

To restart and accelerate the economic recovery that was emerging in Flint when the water crisis hit, we’re supporting local initiatives that provide job training and placement, help budding entrepreneurs to launch new ventures, and engage residents in stabilizing and strengthening their neighborhoods. We continue to support the revitalization of Flint’s downtown corridor, as well as efforts to attract new employers and investment to the overall community.

  • Community Foundation of Greater Flint: $520,000 to support the Flint National Service Accelerator Fund, which helps Flint area agencies leverage state and national service members through the Corporation for National and Community Service and its affiliates. Flint area service members support a wide range of projects and activities, including assistance to area residents affected by the water crisis.

    Genesee Area Focus Fund: $2 million and $50,000 in 2016, and $2 million in 2017 to support efforts by the Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce to promote economic resilience in Flint and assist small businesses struggling to recover from the lead-in-water emergency.

    Center for Community Progress: $1.1 million in 2016 and $1 million in 2017 to support research, advocacy, technical assistance and capacity building to combat the negative effects of property vacancy and abandonment in post-industrial urban areas, with a special focus on helping Flint neighborhoods to recover from the adverse effects of the water crisis.

    Genesee County Land Bank Authority: $240,000 to engage residents affected by the water crisis in the planning and decision-making processes that shape their neighborhoods.

    Local Initiatives Support Corporation: $100,000 to continue the work of transforming distressed neighborhoods into livable communities, with particular focus on assisting Flint’s community development organizations to respond to the adverse effects of the water crisis on neighborhoods.

    Court Street Village Non-Profit Housing Corporation: $40,000 to support comprehensive neighborhood stabilization and revitalization strategies to combat the destabilizing effects of the water crisis in the Central Park and Fairfield Village neighborhoods of Flint.

    Foundation for the Uptown Reinvestment Corporation: $150,000 in 2016 and $150,000 in 2017 to enable the Flint Farmers’ Market to serve as a community health and wellness hub that combats the negative effects of lead exposure through year-round access to fresh produce and to services at the Hurley Children’s Center, which is located on the market’s premises. Also, $100,000 to support Flint area residents in developing food products for distribution and retail consumption through a commercial kitchen food business incubator located within the market. The Flint Food Works kitchen offers a unique community benefit by providing nutritional education to residents on how to prepare healthy food that will mitigate the effects of lead.

    Genesee Chamber Foundation: $159,000 to create an editorially independent online publication that highlights the people and projects helping to fuel Flint’s ongoing revitalization. Also, $150,000 to support a program that, by expanding community access to grocery stores, seeks to help residents obtain the healthy foods that can reduce the long-term impacts of lead exposure.

    Crim Fitness Foundation: $100,000 to support the Crim Fitness Foundation, which focuses on active living, physical fitness, nutrition and mindfulness. The Crim offers year-round programming for children and adults throughout the greater Flint area, much of which can help to address the health and wellness of Flint families and children who have been exposed to lead.

    Genesee County Parks & Recreation Commission: $25,000 to support parks programs and facilities in providing high quality recreational and learning opportunities for children and families, both of which are important in addressing the potential effects of childhood lead exposure.

    United Way of Genesee County: $143,000 to support and expand Flint SOUP, a program that helps area residents express their creative ideas, connect to the city’s broader entrepreneurial network, and explore and advance their small business concepts. Also, $100,000 to support efforts by the Flint Area Reinvestment Office to facilitate innovative community and economic development initiatives in the greater Flint area.

    Mott Community College: $400,000 to help residents obtain job training and career advancement opportunities that will add economic strength to their families and the community.

    St. Luke N.E.W. Life Center: $140,000 to provide underserved workers with job training and wraparound services that will help them to find and retain long-term, living-wage employment.

See Economic Revitalization Grants

Mott’s Commitment to Flint

For more than 90 years, the Mott Foundation has been a steadfast partner to our home community of Flint, Michigan.

When high levels of lead exposure among Flint children were revealed in September 2015, Mott quickly reached out to the city and state to help begin the process of bringing safe, clean drinking water back to the community. We soon made a grant of $100,000 to furnish residents with home water filters and provided $4 million to help reconnect Flint to the Detroit water system.

That funding sowed the seeds for our commitment, announced on May 11, 2016, to provide up to $100 million over five years to help address such immediate and long-term concerns as safe drinking water, health needs and education.

The information and resources on this page illustrate how that grantmaking, which today totals $44.3 million, is helping our hometown recover and rise from the disaster.

How You Can Help

While much of the international media attention has faded, many Flint residents still grapple daily with challenges resulting from the city’s water crisis. What’s more, it’s likely that children who were exposed to lead will require additional support and services for years or decades to come.

Donations to the Flint Child Health and Development Fund will support the long-term health and development needs of Flint children exposed to lead. The fund is held by the Foundation for Flint, a supporting organization of the Community Foundation of Greater Flint.

Help Flint Kids